Welcome to Loddiswell Parish Council

Latest News Events 

Wild About Loddiswell Bio Blitz happening this weekend!!

11.00am Two Activities:

Activity 1:

Activity 2: 2.00pm

Wildlife Walk/Survey, led by Fiona Van Es to the river via Silveridge Lane, includes Kick Sampling Demonstration (survey of invertebrates in the river bed). Meet at Ham Butts (at island with benches).

Wildlife Survey of the Old Churchyard. Meet at the Parish Church 11.00am. Deadline for results to be submitted to the Parish Church.
Raffle Results, Refreshments, Music, Competition while you wait for......

BIOBLITZ 17th & 18th June 2022

After School:

School Hours: 10.15 am:

9.30pm:

7.00am:
8.30am 
onwards: 10.30am:

Programme of Activities Thursday 16th June

School Eco Club – set up moth trap in school grounds

Friday 17th June
School only: Wildlife surveys conducted by the children in the Primary School

grounds and at Ham Butts Forest School.
Wildlife Walk/Survey led by Lynne Kenderdine of Devon Wildlife Trust's

Avon Valley Project. Meet at the Parish Church, All Welcome. Easy Walk
Bat Walk 
led by local bat expert Craig Dunton. Meet at the Parish Church. Bat

Detectors will be provided, please bring a Torch. All Welcome. Saturday 18th June

Wildlife Walk/Survey led by local Ecologist Fiona Van Es. Meet at the Parish Church. Finishing at the Primary School at 8.30am for The Big Breakfast.

Please join us at the The Big Breakfast (organised by and in aid of the School and Preschool PTFA). Moth and other Trap Results.

Parish Church opens for: Submission of Survey Results, Displays, Refreshments, Raffle, Information, Binocular Microscopes. Please bring along your Sightings of Hedgehogs, Swallows, Swifts and House Martins to Plot on our Map of Loddiswell.

3.30pm Announcement of Grand Total

Friday 10.15am:

9.30pm Friday: 7.00am Sat:

11.00am Sat:

The Walks

Easy walk, gentle inclines. From Parish Church visiting Ham Butts, Playing Fields, Clarks Barn Lane, The Old School Field, and Congregational Churchyard observing and recording the wildlife with Lynne Kenderdine.

Easy/Moderate walk from Parish Church, route TBC. Observing and recording bat species with Craig Dunton.

Moderate walk with steep hills and uneven ground. From Parish Church to Hatch
Bridge via green lane (from Towns Lane) to Hatch Bridge, return via green lane to
Clarks Barn Lane and back to Church. Observing and recording wildlife with Fiona Van Es.

Moderate walk with steep hills and uneven ground. From Ham Butts to the river via Ham Farm and Silveridge Lane, returning via Reads Farm. Observing and recording wildlife with Fiona Van Es and others. Kick sampling demonstration at the river.

Those who are less able to walk might like to join us in our survey of the old churchyard at the Parish Church on Saturday at 11.00am.

Refreshments will be available at the Church after the walk on Friday morning and from 10.30am on Saturday. We are very grateful to the PCC for kind their permission to use the Church .

Even if you're not taking part in any of the surveys, please drop in for a cuppa and a chat and a look at our displays.

Toilets are located in the village hall car park and will be open at the Parish Church on the Saturday.

Wildlife Walks and Churchyard Survey:

Please wear stout shoes for walking.

What You Will Need

If hot and sunny it is advisable to wear sunscreen and a hat.

Please bring waterproofs if rain is forecast

A bottle of water (and a light snack perhaps). Refreshments will be provided at the Church.

Binoculars if you have them.

Small wildlife identification guides if you have them.

We strongly recommend downloading the iNaturalist app to your phones to aid with species identification, or another similar app.

A pen and notebook

Children under 16 must be accompanied by a parent or carer.
Dogs to be kept on leads please.
Bat Walk:
Bat detectors will be provided, but please bring your own if you have one Please bring a torch (a head torch is ideal).

We will have some Hi-Vis vests to lend for any road walking, but it is advisable to wear something light in colour so that you are more visible to traffic.

If adverse weather conditions, programme may be subject to change – please check website.www.wildaboutloddiswell.co.uk

 

 

LPC is purchasing and installing Solar Powered lamps for the footpath running between the road and the Playing Fields and also in the car park. 


Wild flowering in Loddiswell:

For those of you who may have concerns about the verges becoming overgrown you might be reassured by looking at an online presentation by Plantlife.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E_zlL-D55MQ

The Plantlife website also has some very useful information: https://www.plantlife.org.uk/uk

The most relevant to us, however, is this very helpful guidance from Devon County Council

Life on the Verge Guidance Document August 2019.pdf (sharepoint.com)

We will be following the step by step instructions they give to ensure that the appropriate permissions are sought and procedures followed on any new projects in the village.

 

 

 

Please send any correspondence or queries via email to:

loddiswellparishclerk@gmail.com or via post to:

3 Park Cottages, Bigbury, Kingsbridge, TQ74AW. Telephone: 07859047187

 


 


Loddiswell is a parish and village in the South Hams district of Devon, England. It lies on the west side of the River Avon or Aune and is three miles NNW from Kingsbridge. There is evidence of occupation going back to Roman times. The villages most famous son and benefactor was Richard Peek who retired here after being one of the Sheriffs of London. The name Loddiswell is a corruption of Saint Loda's well, named after one of the many saints that occurred all over the westcountry, especially in Cornwall.

On the road from the A38 down to Kingsbridge, it stands on the hills above the Avon Valley. The population was 608 in 1801 650 in 1901. Loddiswell has a beautiful Church. The parish church of St. Michael's and All Angels, is of the 14th century, enlarged in the 15th century; its font is Norman. The source of the village's medieval prosperity was wool. Woolston House, the manor house of Staunton manor, is a 17th-century house built near the foundations of an earlier structure; rebuilt in the 18th century, it passed from the Wise/Wyse family to the Weymouth and Allin families. There is a busy pub (The Loddiswell Inn) with good food and Avon Mill Garden Centre which offers stylish accessories for your home, fab food for your larder, a Ladies Boutique, delicious food in the cafe, amazing art and of course, beautiful plants for your garden!

Drop by the South Devon Chilli Farm which sells lots of delicious creations using their home grown chillies in the shop and cafe. The village has lots of walking opportunities in the vicinity such as a walk following the River Avon, the old railway walk and up to Blackdown rings. Great Western railway’s Kingsbridge branch line arrived in 1893 with a stop at Loddiswell station. It was said that Loddiswell was a "brisk walk away" as in fact the station was closer to the less well known and smaller village of Woodleigh. The railway station continued through the steam age but by 1961 it was an unmanned halt and in 1963 it closed for ever. Today the remains of the track is used as a walking route. Plus another exploring the Blackdown Rings, an iron-age fort which was developed 1,000 years later in about 1086 as a Norman motte and bailey - There is evidence at the northern end of this parish that Blackdown hill was used by the Romans. Loddiswell is a middling village with a a curious history of small scale, including a copper mine and a yellow ochre manufactory.

Modern Loddiswell is well served for a small village. There is a Mini Supermarket, which provides Post Office services on certain days, a Pre School and Primary School and a bus service that takes you into the neighbouring town of Kingsbridge. Near the village is Fosse Copse a 1.88 hectares (4.65 acres) woodland on the west facing slope of the Avon Valley owned and managed by the Woodland Trust.[9]  rounding Avon Valley and woodland offers fabulous walking and glorious Devon countryside for you to explore. A great spot for bluebells and wild garlic in the spring and a cool retreat in the summer. Magical on a frosty winter's morning